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A salary-cap deep dive for the Calgary Flames 2022

salary-cap deep dive for the Calgary Flames: Navigating the salary cap is one of the more important tasks for any GM.

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Teams that inking players on deals that match their value (or compensate for future value without breaking the bank) can avoid complete chaos. Those who don’t see the struggles and front office changes.

PHR will look at each NHL team and take a complete look at their cap situation heading into the 2022-23 season. This will focus more on players who are regulars on the roster versus those who may find themselves shuttling between the AHL and NHL. All cap figures courtesy of CapFriendly.

Calgary Flames

Current cap hit: $80,363,333 ($82.5M below cap)

Entry level contracts

F Jakob Pelletier (two years, $863K);

Pelletier has yet to play in the NHL but the 2019 first-rounder is coming off a strong season in the minors that saw him score 27 goals and 35 assists in 66 games with AHL Stockton. That performance will give him a good chance to earn a regular roster spot in training camp. Right now, a bridge deal is the most likely scenario for him but two strong NHL seasons could change that.

Signed Through 2022-23, Non-Entry-Level

  • F Milan Lucic* ($5.25M, UFA)
  • F Trevor Lewis ($800K, UFA)
  • D Nicolas Meloche ($950K,UFA)
  • D Juuso Valimaki ($1.55M, RFA)
  • G Daniel Vladar ($750K, RFA)
  • D MacKenzie Weegar ($3.25M, UFA)
  • *-Edmonton is retaining an additional $750K of Lucic’s cap hit
  • Potential Bonuses:
  • Lewis: $200K

Navigating the salary cap is one of the more important tasks for any GM. Teams that inking players on deals that match their value (or compensate for future value without breaking the bank) can avoid complete chaos. Those who don’t see the struggles and front office changes.

PHR will look at each NHL team and take a complete look at their cap situation heading into the 2022-23 season. This will focus more on players who are regulars on the roster versus those who may find themselves shuttling between the AHL and NHL. All cap figures courtesy of CapFriendly.

Lusk’s struggles over the deal have been well-documented. He’s not the elite force that he was in the prime of his career, and at this point, he’s made the best of limited talent. It’s likely he’ll go year-to-year on future contracts with a cap hit that’s under $2M, if not less. Lewis was Calgary’s second-ranked forward last season and has been a capable fourth liner for several years now. It should give them some positive value on the deal.

Wager is coming over from Florida where he spent most of the last two seasons on the top pair and has developed a quality offensive game in that stretch as well. He will likely play a similar role with the Flames, which puts him in a good position to double his current contract on the open market next summer. The fact that he is a right-shot defender, a side that is always in high demand and short supply, only helps his value. Vilamaki spent most of last season in the minors and didn’t do as well as both sides had hoped. He’s now waiver-eligible which could at least help him stay on the roster but as things stand, he’s more likely to go non-tendered than receive the $1.86M qualifying offer. This is a surprising turn of events for someone who is considered part of their future plans. Meloche saw extended NHL action for the first time last season with San Jose, which helped him earn a one-way deal in free agency. If he can regularly establish himself on the third pairing, another small addition could be acquired on the open market next summer.

Vladar had some ups and downs in his first full NHL season that ended with a 2.75 GAA and .906 SV% in 23 games. Those numbers aren’t the best, but they’re at backup levels, and with increased salaries for second-place finishers, Vladar could easily beat his current cap hit next summer if he continues to perform similarly in 2022-23. Can double.

Signed through 2023-24.

F Mikael Backlund ($5.35M, UFA)

F Dillon Dube ($2.3M, RFA)

D Noah Hanifin ($4.95M, UFA)

D Oliver Kylington ($2.5M, UFA)

F Elias Lindholm ($4.85M, UFA)

F Kevin Rooney ($1.3M, UFA)

D Chris Tariff ($4.5M, UFA)

F Tyler Toffoli ($4.25M, UFA)

D Nikita Zadorov ($3.75M, UFA)

Backlund has spent parts of 14 seasons with Calgary and has been a key role in the middle for most of them. Now 33 and with a few middlemen ahead of him on the depth chart, he’s likely to play a lesser role moving forward and while he’ll still be one of the league’s strongest defensive centers, this deal quickly escalates. will be done. market one. Toffoli was added to Montreal in a midseason trade to give them some extra scoring on the wing and did just that en route to his sixth 20-goal campaign. He’s essentially making second-line money so as long as he stays in that role and continues to produce his usual output, the Flames will get some good value here.

Lindholm has really seen his career take off since coming over from Carolina four years ago. He has continued to be a top-notch defensive player while moving from being a secondary offensive producer to a legitimate top-line center. His contract is certainly a big deal right now as he will have the opportunity to potentially double his current AAV two years from now if he continues to produce at this pace in his new-look lineup. Dube performed well offensively in very limited minutes last season and is poised to play a bigger role in 2022-23. If he can increase his production accordingly, he is someone who can double his value in 2024 as well. He’s unlikely to command much more than that in his next trip through the open market.

Hanifin is coming off a career year offensively, and while he hasn’t become a consistent two-way threat Carolina thought he would make a legitimate top pairing when they selected him fifth overall in 2015. The one is the protector. The market value of these players is much higher than what he is making now, making it another friendly deal for the team. His next contract will be a few million more than that. Tanif has been healthy the past two years, which is not the norm for him, which has led to better returns than Calgary expected so far. He’ll need to regress a bit over the next two years, which would put him in line for a smaller deal in 2024, which would almost certainly be a short-term contract.

Zadorov had a great first season with the Flames but the market wasn’t for him so he chose to stick around. If he can’t become a staple for Calgary in that regard, it’s hard to imagine him getting another contract like this one. Size and physicality aside, depth guards rarely command that kind of contract. Kylington went from a depth piece to a full-time regular last season, providing some secondary production in PR.

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